The third film about Amboseli's EB family (our study elephants) is being shown on the BBC's Natural World on Wednesday 19th January, with a repeat on Sunday 23rd. See below.

If you are among those who can receive the BBC we recommend that you take the time to watch the film. The elephant sounds are carefully selected from the ElephantVoices collection.

Many of you may have heard the surprising news that very few animals died in the devastating Tsunami that killed over 160,000 people. The amazing behavior of animals, particularly elephants, has already been the focus of several articles and documentaries. You will find one such article, which includes a few comments by Joyce, on National Geographics website.

This phenomenon has also attracted interest in Norway, and the National Broadcaster NRK (Schrødingers Katt) will include an interview with Joyce about the response of elephants to earthquakes which will probably air on 10 February.

In September 2003 the ElephantVoices team visited Yala East National Park on Sri Lanka's eastern coast. We had a fantastic experience there thanks to our friend Lalith Seneviratne and our extraordinary host, Park Warden R. Myunideen Mohamed. The parks had just been reopened following two decades of civil unrest.

Mohamed's family are among the many who have lost everything but their lives. All the Park's staff saved themselves, some by running side by side with water buffaloes. The elephants had left for higher ground earlier. The park's new headquarters was submerged in five feet of water, but a miracle saved them from major damage.

Mohamed,  Joyce and Lalith in Yala East September 2003 - one of the areas that  encountered the destructive forces of the Tsunami. (©ElephantVoices)

Mohamed, Joyce and Lalith in Yala East September 2003 - one of the areas that encountered the destructive forces of the Tsunami.
Our thoughts are with the Sri Lankan people, and all others affected by the Sumatra quake.

Cheers, Petter/ElephantVoices